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20121201
20121231
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CSPAN 5
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English 10
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
the world's first true world war. his attack on the french in the western pennsylvania wilderness grew into a global conflict lasting seven years, involve england, franch, austria, russia, prussia, and dozen other nations fighting for control over colonies in north america, africa, asia, and the seas in between. the seven years war changed the map of the world shifting national borders in europe, in africa, in india, and elsewhere. it leveled thousands of towns and villages in europe. killed or maimed more than a million soldiers and civilians, and bankrupted a dozen nations including england and france. remember, it started in britain's north american colonies, and the british government and british people naturally thought british subjects in british north america should share the costs of the war with their fellow citizens in britain. in fact, the government raised property taxes so high in britain that farmers rioted in protest and demanded that americans pay their fair share of the war. in 17 # 64, the british government extended to the colonies a stamp tax that everyone in britai
chicken, some neck. >> rose: when, back to '93, '40, when he had been in the wilderness, 29, and had seen the coming of hitler and argued passionately within the counsel of government. how was that received at that time? >> well, in the middle of the 30s he was regarded as a real nuisance because he was talking about hitler but he was also making a fuss about other issues about india, all the an by-- abdication in which he was felt to be way out on opinions. and the feeling is winston is making a fuss because he wants to get back into office. by 38y, 39y, particularly after munich there is a strong sense, actually, although winston is a nuisance he's right on the fundamental thing. and he is the great advantage for churchill is that when war comes, he is in a position of not having been tainted. he's not got dirty hands. he has a really clear record. can speak with authority. and there is an overwhelming desire to see him back in government. >> and he manages an extraordinary passage for the british parliament because there was this growing unease, particularly after munich, so many peopl
have spent decades in the wilderness and he was the one that found a way to bring them into the majority in the house. how do you balance the pluses and minuses? >> there is not any question that that effort to paint a picture of jim wright's service laid the foundation for a majority. that was a healthy thing. i do not believe it was a good thing -- we have been in that for far too long. appropriations committees work is where either you spend money or you do not. ideally, you are here to work with one another to be as responsive as possible to your own constituents and taxpayers. within the committee itself, the more we can talk to each other as individuals and human beings, the better off the institution will be. >> the kinds of organizations that track members' votes, when they look at yours, saw an ad and earlier you more frequently crossed the aisle to vote with democrats. in your later service, 96% rating. is that reflective -- you tell me. did the house change? >> it is a reflection of polarization that takes place at a leadership level. party loyalty is importa
to be i think. >> reporter: you don't miss the wilder times? >> i still have wild times. reporter: he's got a saying he's fond of repeating. >> i think everything in moderation including moderation. >> reporter: but he's not terribly moderate in his new film. >> loud music ain't good for kids. hurts their ears. >> mind your own business. reporter: he plays a drag queen, half of a gay couple prevented in court from rescuing a disabled boy. after being given numerous gay rights awards, cumming felt the film spoke to basic human rights. >> i want to live in a world that i feel is right. i think it's about being scottish i think actually. we have a, you know, really big sense of snipping out injustice. >> reporter: but then we get back to the fun and off-color side of alan cumming. this is your second. >> this is the second cumming. reporter: he has a fragrance line and a video to go with it. >> sexy. it changes all the same. >> reporter: oh, it is nice. it's leathery. i really like it. >> reporter: well done. thank you. reporter: for such a, you know, naughty name, it has a really... >>
with the antics of "jersey shore." but it's set in the heartland. and in possible, it's wilder than its predecessors. paula faris has a sneak peek. >> reporter: this is the story of nine friends. who stopped being polite. and start getting -- >> buck wild. whatever happens, happens. >> reporter: mtv's latest reality tv spectacle follows a group of friends letting loose southern style. think "jersey shore." meets "honey boo boo." after the shore house crew leaves the air in two weeks, they'll be replaced by the gang on "buck wild." instead of fist-bumping and gtl, it's mudding and atvs. >> i don't have a facebook. i don't have none of that internet stuff. >> they live this outdoor lifestyle that's really free. and it's indearing and invigorating. >> reporter: "buck wild" will have plenty of drunken partying and relationship drama. >> i'm going to be me. >> reporter: just with a dixie twist. >> this is the age of the southern crazy character. there's no question about it. >> reporter: from "honey boo boo" from "toddler & tiaras." to "swamp people," "buck wild" is the latest of country-fri
in the wilderness and he was the one that found a way to bring them into the majority in the house. how do you balance the pluses and minuses? >> there is not any question that that effort to paint a picture of jim wright's service laid the foundation for a majority. that was a healthy thing. i do not believe it was a good thing -- we have been in that for far too long. in turn, it is significant for the american public to know that appropriations committees work is where either you spend money or you do not. ideally, you are here to work with one another to be as responsive as possible to your own constituents and taxpayers. within the committee itself, the more we can talk to each other as individuals and human beings, the better off the institution will be. >> the kinds of organizations that track members' votes, when they look at yours, saw an ad and earlier you more frequently crossed the aisle to vote with democrats. in your later service, 96% rating. is that reflective -- you tell me. did the house change? >> it is a reflection of polarization that takes place at a leadership level. par
- term unemployment. secondly, there's clearly some immediate still a gap issues. you hear it in wilders, engineers, and we should be focused on that. third and perhaps most importantly, the long-term issue, which is really more, since we're talking about the future -- it is less of the current skills that and more of a supply-side issue. we should believe that if we have a large enough supply of skilled workers in the field of dreams notion that if we have the degree of skilled workers, it will help location of jobs to come here and we will be more of a magnet for the high skilled jobs of the future. i think that when we are looking at this, though, we should in our policy solutions make sure we are defining policies right said that we are having the right solutions. sometimes when people say "skill gaps, close to what they're talking about the absolute top of the top engineers and physicians. those people we talk about helping to address right now with high skilled immigration, others are talking about the supply of stem workers in our country -- science, technology, engineering, and m
house members have spent decades in the wilderness and he was the one that found a way to bring them into the majority in the house. how do you balance the pluses and minuses? >> there is not any question that that effort to paint a picture of jim wright's service laid the foundation for a majority. that was a healthy thing. i do not believe it was a good thing -- we have been in that for far too long. appropriations committees work -- in turn the, i think it is significant for the american public to know the appropriations committee work is where either you spend money or you do not. ideally, you are here to work with one another to be as responsive as possible to your own constituents and taxpayers. within the committee itself, the more we can talk to each other as individuals and human beings, the better off the institution will be. and the more responsive it will be. >> the kinds of organizations that track members' votes, when they look at yours, saw an ad and earlier you more frequently crossed the aisle to vote with democrats. in your later service, 96% rating. is that reflect
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)